In The News

The Incubator Program at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law has been featured in several articles.  

Louisiana Record

NEW ORLEANS, April 2017 — As the incubator program at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law continues to grow in popularity, the school recently welcomed seven new attorneys into its intensive two-year mentorship and skills program. Read More>>>

Loyola University Newsroom

NEW ORLEANS, March 2017 -- The Loyola University New Orleans College of Law is pleased to announce that its Incubator Program accepted the largest cohort of attorneys yet, welcoming seven highly qualified candidates in January 2017. The attorneys are practicing in diverse areas of law including Family Law, Civil Rights, Estate Planning, Criminal Law, Personal Injury and Employment Discrimination. Read More>>> 

City Business

NEW ORLEANS, January 2016 -- Loyola University has introduced an incubator program to help recent law school graduates navigate the challenges of the legal industry. Read More>>>

Loyola Lawyer

NEW ORLEANS, Summer 2015 -- The College of Law has announced its inaugural group of participants for the Loyola Incubator Program, an intensive, yearlong mentorship and skills program for recent graduates in their first three years of solo practice. Read More>>>

American Bar Association

WASHINGTON, July 10, 2014 -- The American Bar Association announced the recipients of “catalyst” grants given through the Legal Access Job Corps initiative established by ABA President James R. Silkenat. The grants are available to bar associations, courts, law schools or other groups that propose to employ new lawyers in innovative ways to address the legal needs of poor or moderate-income individuals. Read More>>>

Loyola University Newsroom

NEW ORLEANS, January 22, 2015 -- The Loyola University New Orleans College of Law has announced its inaugural group of participants for the Loyola Incubator Program, an intensive, yearlong mentorship and skills program for recent graduates in their first three years of solo practice. With 25 percent of participants’ time devoted to pro bono legal work, the Incubator Program addresses the unmet legal needs of poor or moderate-income individuals in the Greater New Orleans area. The first year of the two-year pilot program began this month and runs through December 2015. Read More>>>

The New Orleans Advocate

Loyola University’s Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice soon will be training a new wave of solo-practice lawyers to address the legal needs of poor or moderate-income individuals. With help from a grant from the American Bar Association, the college is launching the Loyola Incubator Program — an intensive, yearlong mentorship and skills program for recent graduates of Loyola’s College of Law. Read More>>>

The Washington Times

A grant from the American Bar Association will help fund efforts at Loyola University in New Orleans to train lawyers to address the legal needs of low-income people. Read More>>>

Clarion Herald

The Loyola University New Orleans College of Law Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice soon will be training a new wave of solo practice lawyers equipped with the skills and real-world know-how to address the legal needs of poor or moderate-income individuals. Read More>>>

The National Jurist

The Loyola University New Orleans College of Law has created the Loyola Incubator Program for new lawyers seeking solo practice. The Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice will work with new lawyers in an intensive, year-long mentorship and skills program for recent graduates of the law school. The incubator was jumpstarted thanks to a grant from the American Bar Association. Read More>>>

PreLaw Magazine 

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS COLLEGE OF LAW has created the Loyola Incubator Program for new lawyers seeking solo practice. The program will work with recent graduates in an intensive, year-long mentorship and ski lls program. The incubator was jump-started by a grant from the American Bar Association. The 12-month program will accept five lawyers in their first three years of solo practice and provide them with mentors, peer feedback, case referrals and training in law office management in exchange for pro-bono legal work for low-income clients. Read More>>>