Migration

[NEW] Compassion, Gratitude, Solidarity: President Obama's Executive Action on Immigration [JustSouth Monthly, January 2015]

by Sue Weishar, Ph.D.

   On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced he would take Executive Action on immigration that includes several provisions, including a policy that will provide temporary relief from deportation and work authorization for approximately 3.9 million undocumented immigrants for up to three years.  In his speech to the nation the President explained that although the U.S. Senate had passed a bi-partisan comprehensive immigration reform bill in June 2013, because the U.S. House of Representatives refused to even bring the bill up for a vote, he felt compelled to act to “help make our immigration system more fair and more just.” 

The parents of U.S. citizen children will be the main beneficiaries of this Executive Action. In a case-by-case review of their applications, parents must prove they have lived in the U.S. for five years, pass a stringent background check, come up to date on any back taxes, and pay a hefty fee to cover the costs of the program ($465/application).[1] 

On August 5, 2014 the Jesuit Social Research Institute held the Catholic Teach-In on the Child Refugee Crisis and Its Causes. If you were unable to join us please take a look at some of the media coverage this event received. 

TIME Magazine

Michael's Journey

The Times-Picayune 

Catholics hear refugees explain why they fled Central America 

The Advocate 

N.O. a hub for Honduran children fleeing violence

OUR PERSPECTIVE:

JSRI'S Catholic and Jesuit Perspective on Migration

During the last twenty years, and especially following Hurricane Katrina, there has been a significant increase in the numbers of migrants – both documented and undocumented – in the southern states. More and more immigrants are settling into nontraditional urban and rural receiving communities in the South, where the Hispanic population more than doubled during the 1990’s. The Jesuit Social Research Institute seeks to provide practical, collaborative participatory action research, social analysis, theological reflection, and advocacy related to the issue of migration in the Gulf South in collaboration with Jesuit social and migration networks, Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, Catholic diocesan ministries serving immigrants in the Gulf South, and other advocates.  Our Catholic faith is deeply rooted in the experience of migration.  More

 

2014 ARTICLES ON MIGRATION:

Kids in Crisis: The surge of unaccompanied immigrant children to the border --Weishar

"We Belong To Each Other": Forgetting Our Oneness at a Town Hall Meeting -- Weishar 

Of Tears and Terror: Families Torn Apart By Community Raids in the New Orleans Area-- Weishar

When Italians Were "Others" --Weishar

ARCHIVED ARTICLES ON MIGRATION:

Honduran Agony: The Spiral of Violence and Corruption-- Weishar & Baudouin

Keep "Thanks" in Thanksgiving-- Weishar

One Family Under God: Witnessing for Immigration Reform-- Weishar 

Border Visions and Immigration Reform-- Weishar 

Immigration Reform in Retrospect: Lessons Learned, Lives Changed--Weishar

Refining the Numbers: New Estimates of Unauthorized Immigrants in the U.S.--Weishar

Strangers No Longer: Catholic Teachings on Immigration Reform--Weishar

The "Latino Giant” chooses Obama: An analysis of the 2012 Latino vote--Weishar

"Impossible Subjects" with Impossible Choices--Weishar

Hope for Undocumented Youth--Weishar

A Legacy of “Cussedness”: Update on Alabama’s Harsh Immigration Enforcement Laws -- Weishar

Mississippi Rejects Immigration Enforcement Bill--Weishar

Immigration Enforcement Bill Fails to Pass in Mississippi, None Proposed in Louisiana Legislature -- Weishar

Not Good Law or Good Sense: Proposed Mississippi Immigration Legislation Through the Lens of Catholic Social Teaching -- Weishar

So Help Us God: Life, Death, and Voting Rights in the Texas Colonias--Michael Seifert


View all Migration articles »

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Banner Photo by John Moore