Spetses Church

Spetses Program Course Descriptions

Art and Cultural Property Law  (1 credit hour)

The course aims at equipping students with a sound working knowledge and understanding of key legal issues required in order to operate successfully in the arts market. It will cover the problem of licit and illicit art trade as well as the basic framework for the international protection of cultural property. More specifically, the roles and responsibilities of artists and professional managers in relation to artwork transactions, the protection of artists’ rights, the role of collectors, international art auctions of cultural objects, theft and looting of art objects, bona fide acquisition of stolen art, repatriation/ restitution and return of stolen or looted art will be basically the topics to be discussed. 

Instructor: Professor Anastasia Grammaticaki-Alexiou
Class Dates: June 16 - June 27 (Monday - Friday)
Location: Conference Room 1, Spetses Hotel 
Time: 9:00 – 10:10 AM 
Final Exam: Saturday, June 28, 2014

Comparative Immigration Law (1 credit hour)

Immigration law covers citizenship acquisition, and maintenance of major immigrant and nonimmigrant classifications, along with admission into and exclusion or deportation from the United States and the European Union. In addition, this course will explore the effect of economic downturn on the immigrant population in the United States and EU, with particular attention to Greece.

Class Dates: June 16 - June 27 (Monday - Friday)

Location: Conference Room 2, Spetses Hotel

Time: 9:00 - 10:10 AM

Final Exam: Saturday, June 28, 2014

Comparative Reproductive Bioethics and the Law (1 credit hour)

This course provides an overview of the law and bioethical issues associated with assisted reproductive technologies. Combining aspects of tort, constitutional, administrative and criminal law, the course begins with a philosophical examination of ethical theories followed by an examination of legal issues arising from assisted reproduction. In addition to assisted reproduction, the course will explore related issues of cloning and stem cell research.

Instructor: Professor Kathryn Venturatos Lorio
Class Dates: June 16 - June 27 (Monday - Friday)
Location: Conference Room 1, Spetses Hotel 
Time: 10:20 - 11:30 AM
Final Exam: Saturday, June 28, 2014

Comparative Constitutional Law (1 credit hour)

This course covers the fundamentals of the constitutional systems of Greece, Russia, and Europe.

The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the law and institutions of the European Union and Russia, in particular to examine their origins and development.

The first part of the course concentrates on constitutional issues, including the historical, political and legal contexts from which the current framework for human rights in Greece, Russia, and Europe has emerged, and analyzes the international and regional instruments and mechanisms for monitoring and enforcing human rights. Select case studies explore the complex interplay between law and policy and the role of international and national actors in responding to human rights violations.

We will start with the recognition of human rights and freedoms in Russia’s Constitution and the constitutions of some European countries such as Greece, France, Germany, and Switzerland, and wewill analyze the treatment ofviolations of human rights in the countries of the Council of Europe, the relationship between these and similar rights in international charters on human rights, and the activities of the European Court of Human Rights. The course will also analyze the activity of the European Parliament and the executive bodies of the European Union as international organizations.
The portion of the course covering the systems of government and administrative bodies is devoted to the examination of parliaments in Russia, governments, judicial authorities of Russia and European states, and the theoretical foundations for construction and operation of these bodies (e.g., the principle of separation of powers). Comparative analysis of the powers of the heads of state of Russia, Greece, France, and Italy will highlight the differences in the forms of these states.

Special attention will be paid to the structure and activities of the Constitutional Courts of Russia, Greece, Germany and France, the problems of common cases under their jurisdictions, and differences in their activities.

Instructor: Professor Gayane Davidyan
Class Dates: June 16 - June 27 (Monday - Friday)
Location: Conference Room 1, Spetses Hotel 
Time: 10:20 - 11:30 AM 
Final Exam: Saturday, June 28, 2014

Comparative Immigration Law (1 credit hour)

Immigration law covers citizenship acquisition, and maintenance of major immigrant and nonimmigrant classifications, along with admission into and exclusion or deportation from the United States and the European Union. In addition, this course will explore the effect of economic downturn on the immigrant population in the United States and EU, with particular attention to Greece.

Instructor: Professor Nikolaos Davrados
Class Dates: June 16 - June 27 (Monday - Friday)
Location: Conference Room 2, Spetses Hotel 
Time: 10:20 - 11:30 AM 
Final Exam: Saturday, June 28, 2014

Private International Law (1 credit hour)

This seminar will survey approaches to the choice-of-law process, which is mandated whenever a private transaction has contacts with more than one jurisdiction. Students will be exposed to the American choice-of-law revolution of the 20th century in the areas of tort and contract. The American approach will be compared to the more evolutionary process in the European Union that culminated in Rome I (for contracts) and Rome II (for torts).

Instructor: Professor Dian Tooley-Knoblett

Class Dates: June 16 - June 27 (Monday - Friday)

Location: Conference Room 1, Spetses Hotel 

Time: 11:40 AM - 12:50 PM 

Final Exam: Saturday, June 28, 2014